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2 edition of Crop-water production functions and economic implications for the Texas High Plains region found in the catalog.

Crop-water production functions and economic implications for the Texas High Plains region

Paul G. Hoyt

Crop-water production functions and economic implications for the Texas High Plains region

by Paul G. Hoyt

  • 15 Want to read
  • 23 Currently reading

Published by Natural Resource Economics Division, Economic Research Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture in [Washington, D.C.?] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Agricultural productivity -- Texas.,
  • Irrigation farming -- Economic aspects -- Texas.,
  • Crops and soils -- Texas.,
  • Plants, Effect of soil moisture on.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementPaul G. Hoyt.
    SeriesERS staff report -- no. AGES 820405., Staff report / NRE Economic Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture, NRE staff report
    ContributionsUnited States. Dept. of Agriculture. Natural Resource Economics Division.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination30 p. ;
    Number of Pages30
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18035461M

    • In , the USDA designated Texas counties as primary natural disaster areas due to drought. • Texas’ agricultural industry suffered losses attributable to drought of $ billion in losses in alone. • If water supply needs are not met by , the Texas WDB projects that the state will lose over 1. The Ogallala Aquifer has experienced a continuous decline in water levels due to decades of irrigation pumping with minimal recharge. Corn is one of the major irrigated crops in the semi-arid Northern High Plains (NHP) of Texas. Selection of less water-intensive crops may provide opportunities for groundwater conservation. Modeling the long-term hydrologic impacts of alternative crops can be a.

    Islam MA, Hoque MA, Ahmed KM, Butler AP et al., and economic effects of climate variability and well yield on irrigated agriculture through a case study in the Texas High Plains region of the United States. Our results demonstrate that reductions in well yield will constrain farmers' ability to use irrigation as an adaptive tool, and may. with potential crop ET to better represent actual water demand. Data from the Texas High Plains Evapotranspi-ration network was used to calculate SPEIs for the major irrigated crops. Trends and magnitudes of crop-specific, time-series SPEIs followed crop water demand patterns for summer crops. Such an observation suggests.

    This research shows a case from Jordan where geospatial techniques were utilized for irrigation water auditing. The work was based on assessing records of groundwater abstraction in relation to irrigated areas and estimated crop water consumption in three water basins: Yarmouk, Amman-Zarqa and Azraq. Mapping of irrigated areas and crop water requirements was carried out using remote sensing. Abstract. Proceedings of the World Environmental and Water Resources Congress, held in Honolulu, Hawaii, May , Sponsored by the Environmental and .


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Crop-water production functions and economic implications for the Texas High Plains region by Paul G. Hoyt Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Crop-water production functions and economic implications for the Texas High Plains region. [Paul G Hoyt; United States. Department. Crop-water production functions [microform]: economic implications for Colorado / Paul G.

Hoyt; Crop-water production functions and economic implications for the Texas High Plains region [microform] Crop-water production functions and economic implications for Washington [microform] /. On the Texas High Plains, the decline in the saturated thickness of the Ogallala Aquifer necessitates improvements in agronomic management at the farm level in conjunction with strategic planning of groundwater resources.

With the rise of irrigation during the 20th century, producers maximized yields with irrigation, oftentimes in excess of crop water demand. Estimating Crop Water Use of Cotton in the Texas High Plains data from ten bare soil fields in the Texas High Plains region in and the same as alfalfa water-production functions.

Irrigation data from Castro and Parmer counties, Texas, [microform] / by Paul L. Rettman and Gene D. McAdoo U.S. Dept. of the Interior, Geological Survey: Open-File Services Section, Western Distribution Branch Denver, CO major driving forces of the Texas High Plains economy and played a dominant role in the livelihood of the people and United States at large (Guerrero and Amosson, ).

According to Amosson et al. () the direct value of agriculture in the Texas High Plains exceeded $ billion duringand agribusiness contribu Goals / Objectives 1) Compare irrigation water application scenarios for subsurface drip irrigated crops in conjunction with conservation tillage practices.

2) Evaluate high value alternative crops for use with a subsurface drip irrigation system. 3) Evaluate cultural practices for the production of commonly grown crops such as cotton, wheat, grain sorghum under a subsurface drip irrigation.

Crop water production functions (CWPFs) are often expressed as crop yield vs. consumptive water use or irrigation water applied.

CWPFs are helpful for optimizing management of limited water resources, but are site-specific and vary from year to year, especially when yield. A significant portion of the intensively cultivated agricultural areas in the U.S.

is located in the Texas High Plains and Rolling Plains. In recent years, decreasing ground water supplies and precipitation variability are presenting challenges for profitable cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) production in these regions.

In general, functions relating crop production to water use can be categorize into two groups: water production functions (WPF) and crop water production functions (CWPF) (Igbadun et al., Research Project: Precipitation and Irrigation Management to Optimize Profits from Crop Production Location: Soil and Water Management Research Publications (Clicking on the reprint icon will take you to the publication reprint.) Comparison of lysimeter-derived crop coefficients for legacy and drought tolerant maize hybrids grown in the Texas High Plains - (Peer Reviewed Journal).

El Nino southern oscillation effects on dryland crop production in the Texas High Plains - (Peer Reviewed Journal) Baumhardt, R.L., Mauget, S.A., Schwartz, R.C., Jones, O. El Nino southern oscillation effects on dryland crop production in the Texas High Plains.

to keep up or catch up with crop water demand. Despite lower water use rates in the early growing season, the soil may dry quickly without the producer realizing it. As a result, the irrigation system may not be able to catch up with the crop water demand, and the crop yield may suffer.

51 CHP01 26 Technical Report No. 30 Energy Production and Use In Colorado High Plains Regions February, CWRRI. Emm McBroom. WMA. 51 CHP01 27 Technical Report No. 29 An Economic Input-Output Study of the High Plains Region of Eastern Colorado February, John R.

McKean, Ray K. Ericson, Joseph C. CWRRI. WMA. The Ogallala Aquifer, one of the largest freshwater aquifers in the world, supports 30% of U.S. crop and animal production, increases agricultural production by more than $12 billion annually, and impacts global food supplies.

However, much of the Ogallala is rapidly declining and climate change will only compound this challenge. Our long-term goal is to optimize use of groundwater in the.

EVALUATION OF SUBSURFACE DRIP IRRIGATION STRATEGIES FOR THE OPTIMAL USE OF GROUND WATER FOR COTTON PRODUCTION IN THE TEXAS SOUTH-PLAINS J.P., W. Lyle, and E. Segarra. Economic evaluation of Texas High Plains cotton irrigated by LEPA and subsurface drip. Texas Journal of Agri cultural and Natural Resources, 13(1): Systems in the Texas High Plains.) Systems Research in the Southern Region Sustainable Crop/Livestock Systems in the Texas High Plains: Phase I Introduction: Crop and livestock production in the Texas High Plains generates over $ billion in annual revenues but has depended on irrigation with water from the Ogallala Aquifer.

"Evaluation of selected crop water production functions for an irrigated maize crop," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 94(), pagesDecember. Yuan, Chengfu & Feng, Shaoyuan & Huo, Zailin & Ji, Quanyi, List of Tables. Based on 90, acres of irrigated land in the Edwards aquifer region (Texas Water Development Board reportAugust ), we estimate that when all irrigators in the region will implement limited irrigation scheduling, 14, to 19, million gallons of water (50, to 60, acre-ft) per year can be saved and made available for other.

Collaborators: Utah State, Colorado State, and Texas A&M, El Paso Method Estimating Crop-Water Production Functions for Varying Crop Water Application Rates and Water Quality Levels Methods will be developed to combine economic crop water production functions at the farm and basin level.Left: Rick Kellison, program director for the Texas Alliance for Water Conservation (TAWC), and Vivien Allen, retired Texas Tech forage agronomist and animal led a long-term integrated crop–livestock experiment that helped launch the TAWC program.

Photo by Philip Brown. Right: “There is no long-term future for corn [in the Texas High Plains] because it just takes too much.Texas leads all other states in the U.S.

in numbers of beef cattle with the High Plains region including 8 of the 10 leading counties (USDA,TASS, ). The Texas High Plains also has the highest concentration of cattle in feedlots in the U.S.